language

language

3 phrases public health advocates should use with caution -- or not at all

The words we use to describe public health issues can open people up to new ideas or reinforce old ways of thinking, undermining advocates' efforts to make the case for policies that support health. Here are three common phrases that may be doing the latter. Read more >


From me to us: Taking racism from the individual to the structural

Using language that moves racism from a personal issue to a structural one is key to showing how policy changes can benefit entire populations. But what does this mean for those who have experienced the personal pain of racism? How can those experiences fuel efforts to reframe it? Read more >


Shooting ourselves in the foot: How the way we talk about food issues puts public health advocates at a disadvantage

Language matters. It affects not only how people view an issue but also how they act on it. When it comes to discussing food policy, a couple of language pitfalls may be thwarting advocates' efforts at change. Read more >


What's really behind the soda industry's 'choice' rhetoric

Following New York City's public hearing on Mayor Michael Bloomberg's proposal to cap soda sizes at 16 ounces, critics pushed back, saying the proposal "restricts choice." The trouble is, those critics don't explain whose choice is being restricted. And that's because the answer is soda companies'. Read more >


How sexist language is undermining efforts to improve public health

Critics of public health measures often use the phrase "nanny state" to evoke fears about the U.S. government exerting too much control over people's lives. But what's really behind the words? And what do public health advocates lose when they repeat it? Read more >


Are you reinforcing your opposition's arguments?

Do you ever find yourself bringing up your opposition's frame before she or he does? By raising the precise frames we intend to counter, even to refute them, we are creating hurdles we now must jump over. And we may be suggesting these arguments to those who had not yet considered them. Read more >



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